Grandmother Skydives For Charity On Her 80th Birthday

Leaping out of a plane thousands of feet above the ground doesn’t usually make the list of ‘things nanniet enjoy doing’ – but one fearless Maltese woman showed the world that thrill-seeking has no age limit.

Lucia Tanti celebrated her 80th birthday in style, as she went skydiving for a cause. And if you’re impressed by her incredible spirit, you can make her birthday even better by donating here.

Most people would be a little nervous before their first skydive, but not Lucia. She tells Lovin Malta that she was so excited to go, she couldn’t get a wink of sleep the night before.

When asked what inspired such a crazy venture, her response was simple: “I want to feel as free as a bird. I would also love to take the opportunity to help others feel free as possible – especially those suffering from cancer and other sickness.”

If you were considering taking the plunge and, well, plunging, Lucia has some kind, nanna advice for you. “If you want to do it, why not? It is very safe and the instructors know exactly what they’re doing.”

“Plus,” she added, “doing it for a good cause makes me want to do it over and over again.”

We cannot emphasise just how awestuck and inspired we are by Lucia’s adventure, and we hope everyone keeps donating to her birthday fundraiser to keep this positive surge going.

This Memorial Day, we celebrate a marine who sprang into action to save two children from drowning. It happened at a beach in Nanakuli called Mermaid Caves. It all started soon after Caleb Franklin and his family got to the beach. At first, they thought the two young children were playing.

This Memorial Day, we celebrate a Marine who sprang into action to save two children from drowning. It happened at a beach in Nanakuli called Mermaid Caves.
It all started soon after Caleb Franklin and his family got to the beach. At first, they thought the two young children were playing.
Then Franklin heard them screaming for help, bobbing up and down in the water. Without thinking twice, Franklin sprang into action.
Threw my shoes off, jumped in the water, and got to them, said Franklin, I forced myself down, got sand under my feet, and grabbed them turned and just went.
The water was deep and the current was strong. The 2 kids were 30 feet from shore, but Franklin was able to get both children to safety.
Their faces, I dont think Im ever going to forget that sight. Its just, I dont know, terror maybe. They were just petrified of just crying and screaming, he said.
Were told the kids swallowed a lot of water but theyre okay. Franklin says he was in the right place at the right time.
Thats what it came down to, God placing you when you needed to be, he said.
His family tells us this is who Franklin is.
His Marine corps training really kicked and it was automatic for him, said Christopher Ferkel, who was with Franklin at the time, thats what Marines are trained to do, they are out there to save lives.
There was a man walking towards us, an older gentleman, it was the father and he just said thank you thank you five times, said Franklin, Im just glad they are okay. Their parents could have their kids in their hands.
There is no lifeguard tower at that particular beach, but Ocean Safety tells us lifeguards do mobile water patrols in the area.
Lifeguards were on duty this Memorial Day and even pulled some overtime hours.
Summer is around the corner and as more kids head to the beach officials want to remind everybody about staying safe in the water.

This Memorial Day, we celebrate a marine who sprang into action to save two children from drowning. It happened at a beach in Nanakuli called Mermaid Caves. It all started soon after Caleb Franklin and his family got to the beach. At first, they thought the two young children were playing.

This Memorial Day, we celebrate a Marine who sprang into action to save two children from drowning. It happened at a beach in Nanakuli called Mermaid Caves.
It all started soon after Caleb Franklin and his family got to the beach. At first, they thought the two young children were playing.
Then Franklin heard them screaming for help, bobbing up and down in the water. Without thinking twice, Franklin sprang into action.
Threw my shoes off, jumped in the water, and got to them, said Franklin, I forced myself down, got sand under my feet, and grabbed them turned and just went.
The water was deep and the current was strong. The 2 kids were 30 feet from shore, but Franklin was able to get both children to safety.
Their faces, I dont think Im ever going to forget that sight. Its just, I dont know, terror maybe. They were just petrified of just crying and screaming, he said.
Were told the kids swallowed a lot of water but theyre okay. Franklin says he was in the right place at the right time.
Thats what it came down to, God placing you when you needed to be, he said.
His family tells us this is who Franklin is.
His Marine corps training really kicked and it was automatic for him, said Christopher Ferkel, who was with Franklin at the time, thats what Marines are trained to do, they are out there to save lives.
There was a man walking towards us, an older gentleman, it was the father and he just said thank you thank you five times, said Franklin, Im just glad they are okay. Their parents could have their kids in their hands.
There is no lifeguard tower at that particular beach, but Ocean Safety tells us lifeguards do mobile water patrols in the area.
Lifeguards were on duty this Memorial Day and even pulled some overtime hours.
Summer is around the corner and as more kids head to the beach officials want to remind everybody about staying safe in the water.

Grandmother Skydives For Charity On Her 80th Birthday

Leaping out of a plane thousands of feet above the ground doesn’t usually make the list of ‘things nanniet enjoy doing’ – but one fearless Maltese woman showed the world that thrill-seeking has no age limit.

Lucia Tanti celebrated her 80th birthday in style, as she went skydiving for a cause. And if you’re impressed by her incredible spirit, you can make her birthday even better by donating here.

Most people would be a little nervous before their first skydive, but not Lucia. She tells Lovin Malta that she was so excited to go, she couldn’t get a wink of sleep the night before.

When asked what inspired such a crazy venture, her response was simple: “I want to feel as free as a bird. I would also love to take the opportunity to help others feel free as possible – especially those suffering from cancer and other sickness.”

If you were considering taking the plunge and, well, plunging, Lucia has some kind, nanna advice for you. “If you want to do it, why not? It is very safe and the instructors know exactly what they’re doing.”

“Plus,” she added, “doing it for a good cause makes me want to do it over and over again.”

We cannot emphasise just how awestuck and inspired we are by Lucia’s adventure, and we hope everyone keeps donating to her birthday fundraiser to keep this positive surge going.

Illinois Graveyard vandalized with swastikas, community comes together to clean the gravestones

(GLEN CARBON, Ill.) — A manager at a southwestern Illinois cemetery said Sunday that most of the gravestones spray-painted with swastikas have been cleaned and would be in good condition as families visit on Memorial Day.

Cleaners scrubbed the paint off most of the more than 150 markers since Saturday morning, when the vandalism was discovered, family services manager Jeanne Brunette said by phone from Glen Carbon’s Sunset Hill Cemetery.

The cemetery is nondenominational and there didn’t appear to be a pattern to which gravestones were defaced, Brunette said, adding: “We did not see that he was targeting certain family names.”

Police in nearby Edwardsville announced on Facebook that a 34-year-old man was apprehended Saturday as the suspected vandal. They haven’t provided details, including what might have motivated his actions.

Several dozen volunteers showed up to help cemetery staff clean the gravestones, while others brought food for the workers, Brunette said. She said that display of support was heartwarming.

In a difficult situation, that support amounted to “a big hug from the community,” she said.

Edwardsville police Sgt. Justin Towell told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch that multiple homes in a subdivision were also vandalized, saying the same person may be responsible for both incidents.

Life as a Private: A Study of the Motivations and Experiences of Junior Enlisted Personnel in the U.S. Army

The U.S. Army Recruiting Command asked RAND Arroyo Center to undertake research to improve its understanding of soldiers’ motivations to join the Army, and how the reality of Army life matches up with expectations. Who joins, why, and how satisfied are they with their decisions? This study’s portrayal of the U.S. Army private could serve as an educational tool for a variety of important audiences, such as Army senior leadership, junior officers, noncommissioned officers, and prospective new recruits.

To conduct this study, RAND researchers interviewed 81 soldiers, ranked E-1 to E-4, generally assigned to their first Modified Table of Organization and Equipment unit. The findings from this study offer a rich description of experiences by a select few junior enlisted Army personnel; however, due to sample size limitations, the findings of this study cannot be generalized to the U.S. Army as a whole or to any rank or Career Management Field category. The research found that soldiers join the Army for family, institutional, and occupational reasons, and many value the opportunity to become a military professional. They value their relationships with other soldiers, enjoy their social lives, and are satisfied with Army life.

Life as a Private: A Study of the Motivations and Experiences of Junior Enlisted Personnel in the U.S. Army

The U.S. Army Recruiting Command asked RAND Arroyo Center to undertake research to improve its understanding of soldiers’ motivations to join the Army, and how the reality of Army life matches up with expectations. Who joins, why, and how satisfied are they with their decisions? This study’s portrayal of the U.S. Army private could serve as an educational tool for a variety of important audiences, such as Army senior leadership, junior officers, noncommissioned officers, and prospective new recruits.

To conduct this study, RAND researchers interviewed 81 soldiers, ranked E-1 to E-4, generally assigned to their first Modified Table of Organization and Equipment unit. The findings from this study offer a rich description of experiences by a select few junior enlisted Army personnel; however, due to sample size limitations, the findings of this study cannot be generalized to the U.S. Army as a whole or to any rank or Career Management Field category. The research found that soldiers join the Army for family, institutional, and occupational reasons, and many value the opportunity to become a military professional. They value their relationships with other soldiers, enjoy their social lives, and are satisfied with Army life.

Utah faith and community leaders meet for suicide prevention summit w/focus on LGTBQ, Natives and Veterans

WEST JORDAN, Utah — Members of Utah’s recently-formed Suicide Prevention Task Force, along with leaders in Utah communities and faith organizations, met Tuesday to discuss the issue of suicide in Utah and how they can work together on suicide prevention.

Representatives of the Catholic Diocese of Salt Lake, the Episcopal Diocese of Utah, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, leaders from the Jewish community, members of Utah Protestant faith groups, and representatives for the State of Utah and some of its communities participated in the summit.

“By convening this summit, the [Utah Suicide Prevention] Coalition will bring Utah faith leaders together to: learn about comprehensive strategies for suicide prevention and mental health promotion, understand the scope of suicide in Utah, share information on best practices, understand available resources, and make a call to action for next steps for moving suicide prevention forward as an interfaith partnership,” a statement from the coalition said.

According to The Centers for Disease Control, Utah had the fifth-highest rate of suicide deaths in the United States for 2014-2016. The states with higher suicide rates than Utah are Montana, Alaska, New Mexico and Wyoming.

“They specifically asked me to talk about mental illness and suicide in a high school graduation speech. That’s something that, I don’t know has ever happened, but it speaks to the change that everyone wants to work on this together. And so, I have great hope,” said Utah Lt. Governor Spencer Cox, who also spoke at Tuesday’s summit.

If you or someone you know is struggling with thoughts of suicide, help is available 24/7 by calling 1-800-273-TALK. Utahns can also visit Hope4Utah and the Suicide Prevention Resource Center for additional resources. You can also download the SafeUT app for instant, confidential crisis services.

Illinois Graveyard vandalized with swastikas, community comes together to clean the gravestones

(GLEN CARBON, Ill.) — A manager at a southwestern Illinois cemetery said Sunday that most of the gravestones spray-painted with swastikas have been cleaned and would be in good condition as families visit on Memorial Day.

Cleaners scrubbed the paint off most of the more than 150 markers since Saturday morning, when the vandalism was discovered, family services manager Jeanne Brunette said by phone from Glen Carbon’s Sunset Hill Cemetery.

The cemetery is nondenominational and there didn’t appear to be a pattern to which gravestones were defaced, Brunette said, adding: “We did not see that he was targeting certain family names.”

Police in nearby Edwardsville announced on Facebook that a 34-year-old man was apprehended Saturday as the suspected vandal. They haven’t provided details, including what might have motivated his actions.

Several dozen volunteers showed up to help cemetery staff clean the gravestones, while others brought food for the workers, Brunette said. She said that display of support was heartwarming.

In a difficult situation, that support amounted to “a big hug from the community,” she said.

Edwardsville police Sgt. Justin Towell told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch that multiple homes in a subdivision were also vandalized, saying the same person may be responsible for both incidents.

Utah faith and community leaders meet for suicide prevention summit w/focus on LGTBQ, Natives and Veterans

WEST JORDAN, Utah — Members of Utah’s recently-formed Suicide Prevention Task Force, along with leaders in Utah communities and faith organizations, met Tuesday to discuss the issue of suicide in Utah and how they can work together on suicide prevention.

Representatives of the Catholic Diocese of Salt Lake, the Episcopal Diocese of Utah, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, leaders from the Jewish community, members of Utah Protestant faith groups, and representatives for the State of Utah and some of its communities participated in the summit.

“By convening this summit, the [Utah Suicide Prevention] Coalition will bring Utah faith leaders together to: learn about comprehensive strategies for suicide prevention and mental health promotion, understand the scope of suicide in Utah, share information on best practices, understand available resources, and make a call to action for next steps for moving suicide prevention forward as an interfaith partnership,” a statement from the coalition said.

According to The Centers for Disease Control, Utah had the fifth-highest rate of suicide deaths in the United States for 2014-2016. The states with higher suicide rates than Utah are Montana, Alaska, New Mexico and Wyoming.

“They specifically asked me to talk about mental illness and suicide in a high school graduation speech. That’s something that, I don’t know has ever happened, but it speaks to the change that everyone wants to work on this together. And so, I have great hope,” said Utah Lt. Governor Spencer Cox, who also spoke at Tuesday’s summit.

If you or someone you know is struggling with thoughts of suicide, help is available 24/7 by calling 1-800-273-TALK. Utahns can also visit Hope4Utah and the Suicide Prevention Resource Center for additional resources. You can also download the SafeUT app for instant, confidential crisis services.